Nome Schoolhouse

2021, North Dakota, Road Trip, States

Despite our passions for textile arts as well as fiber mill machinery, if it hadn’t been for Harvest Hosts we might have missed this treasure. In searching for an overnight stay, we discovered Nome Schoolhouse in Nome, North Dakota. Three years ago Chris Armbrust & Teresa Perleberg combined forces to create a remarkable center for all things fiber and more. Both have their own fiber businesses and together they conceived a plan to create an all encompassing fiber arts center. In 2018 they set out on a mission to find the right building in the right location and settled on this lovely building that served as the local school from 1916 until 1970. Although the school building passed to private ownership thereafter, marvelously much of the school remained undisturbed and in fact there were still textbooks, trophies, and many other items remaining that have been preserved and incorporated into what is now an amazing multi-use facility. That is after three years of extensive renovations that required a good degree of sweat equity from not only Chris & Teresa but many other members of their families. We enjoyed our tour that included the fiber mill in the basement, the renovated gym turned event center, classrooms for fiber artists to gather, a fabulous gift shop, and the dining room/bar which is the spot where locals gather weekly for Thirsty Thursdays and where we hobnobbed with some lace knitters who were gathering for a weekend retreat. Besides all of that there is a boutique hotel upstairs. Especially if you’re a devotee of craft involving fibers from sheep, alpaca, goat, camel, bison, and more and would love to tour a fiber mill, take some classes, or just mingle with Nome locals, this could be your place.

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